Glenora Psychology Tip Sheets

Category Archives: Relationships

Conflict Resolution

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Strategies for Resolving Conflict There are several alternative processes that can be accessed to resolve disputes between individuals or groups. One alternative for conflict resolution is that of arbitration. The term arbitration is used when those in dispute agree to place the decision-making process in the hands of an individual or a group with the authority to make a final decision after each person in dispute has had a chance to fully present his or her case. Arbitration provides opportunities for preserving and debating the merits of the opposing viewpoints. The arbitration process allows for written and verbal presentations of the issues without the constraints inherent in litigation. Evidence is usually presented on a more informal basis, legal counsel may be included in the process, and the process is adversarial in nature. The Arbitration Act governs the arbitration process and the arbitrator’s decision is final and binding on both parties….

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Bullying: A Community Problem

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Definition: Bullying involves physical and emotional behaviours that are intentional, controlling and hurtful. Bullying is a serious problem that creates a climate of harassment and fear. Victims experience a sense of isolation and loss of self-confidence. Those who bully face rejection, school failure and antisocial behaviour patterns that can continue well into adulthood. Examples: Physical bullying: hitting, poking, shoving, jabbing, fighting, unwanted touching, blocking, stealing, writing graffiti about others, pinching, chasing and cornering, tripping and vandalizing. Emotional bullying: making fun of others, incessant teasing, name-calling, threatening, mocking, putting down, punching, making offensive racial or sexual comments, ganging up on others, belittling, excluding others from a group or activity, shunning, ignoring and lying. General Information on Bullying Bullying is a society problem, not just a school problem. The strongest influence on children’s behaviour is not the school or what they watch on television, it is the behaviour they observe within their…

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Being Emotionally Sensitive

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To be emotionally sensitive is to be aware of your own feelings and the feelings of others. Emotional sensitivity is a necessary building block for close, satisfying relationships. But some people are too sensitive. It’s like trying to get close to a porcupine. If you are too sensitive, you have little awareness of the depths of your own feelings except to know that your emotions are powerful and painful. You are particularly aware of how the behaviour of others affects you. If you are too sensitive you take things personally, you often react defensively to other people, you judge others as being hurtful to you, and your primary interest is in your own experience rather than in what the other person is thinking or feeling. An overly sensitive person is someone who has been hurt in important childhood relationships. There is great difficulty with trust and closeness and an unconscious…

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